Genealogy Blog

A blog about genealogy in Denmark

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You cannot set your navigation at a cadastral lot number if you come to Denmark to see your ancestor's farm or house, so in this post I demonstrate how to find today's address from the lot number.


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Danish fire insurance records contain descriptions of each building in terms of size and building materials. The records list the head of household of the house or farm, even if he was not the owner of the property. How much space do you think your ancestors had per person?


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Danish tenant farmers had to do corvée work for the land owner. Beginning in year 1800 land owners had to record the work done by each farmer. A lot of these records have been kept.


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Before the mid 1800s, many Danish farmers did not own the farm or house they lived in, but they leased it from the King or manors or other large estates. The tenancy, also called copyhold, was often passed on to a son or other relative, so copyhold records can provide evidence for relationships.


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In this post I provide an example of how you can identify the cadastral lot number of your ancestor's farm based on his listing in a census.


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The Danish National Archives do not keep all kinds of records, but luckily many Danish parishes or towns have a local history archive. More than five-hundred Danish local history and town archives have started digitizing their holdings and presenting them to the public free of charge at the website Arkiv.dk.


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I have joined the Blogging from A-Z April Challenge and in this post I reveal my theme.


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Most of my female ancestors spent their youth preparing for a life as a housewife and it can seem difficult to find detailed information about their premarital life. As part of the Family History Writing Challenge, I have decided to write about my grandmother’s life from she left her home about age fourteen until she married at age twenty-four. In this post and upcoming posts, I will share some of the sources I use for this story.


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Would you trust a machine to make your family tree for you?


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My grandmother Jenny Kristine Juhl was born in 1921 in Holsted Parish. Birth records from that time contain useful information to finding more details about her parents, but how can you figure it out, if you do not understand Danish?