Genealogy Blog

A blog about genealogy in Denmark

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Danish soldiers, who took part in one or both Schleswig Wars of 1848-1850 and 1864 could apply for a commemorative medal. The applications have been indexed, so it is relatively easy to search for your Danish ancestors in these records. In this blog post I will teach you how to find your Danish war heroes.


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Recipe collections can tell a lot about your ancestors. My great-grand aunt Else Marie Valborg Andersen Fisker (b. 1893 in Silkeborg, Denmark) left behind a notebook filled with recipes and one of them resembles my recipe for koldskål.


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From 1683 until 1851, marriage in a church was the only legal method of getting married in Denmark. A marriage record from this period is therefore found in the church records, also called parish registers. Since 1851, civil marriage has been an option for Danes. For family researchers this means more sources to search. I was married in a church eight years ago today. I am celebrating my anniversary with this introduction to Danish marriage records from three centuries.


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You can only find the address of the property or the correct map, with your ancestor's property if you know the name of the ejerlav (property area). In this post, I will demonstrate how to find the name of the ejerlav.


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In the first part of this tutorial series, I explained how to find a lot on an old map and how to find today’s address of the place. The search was based on the cadastral identification number found in a 1916 census record. However, in many cases we know neither the cadastral id number nor today’s address of the lot. In this part of the tutorial, I will demonstrate how to find the cadastral id number, when it is not written in the census or any other identified record.


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If your ancestor owned real property, you can learn a lot more about the living conditions of him and his family than if he had been a day laborer. If you are lucky, the building where your ancestors lived still exists today. Whether you know the address, the cadastral identification number or only the place name, it is often possible to find the exact lot on old maps from when your ancestors lived there. In this part of the maps tutorial, I will show how to find a lot, when you know the cadastral id number, for instance from a census.


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Danish birth records are primarily found in church records from The Church of Denmark, which is a Christian church. The vikings gradually turned Christian in the 10th century. At least since then, Denmark has been divided into parishes. Until 1849, a parish was an area whose inhabitants attended the same church, the parish church. In my last post, I scrutinized a birth record from a market town. In this post, I will show an example from a rural parish.


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Since 1646, Folkekirken (the Church of Denmark) has been obliged to keep records of births, which took place in the Danish parishes. No secular registration of births takes place in Denmark, except in Southern Jutland. A few other religions have obtained the right to keep records for the members of their congregation, but the vast majority of births are recorded by Folkekirken. When searching for Danish birth records, the place to start is therefore the parish registers, also called church books.


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When searching for Danish ancestors, it is important to understand the Danish naming traditions. Today most Danish infants get either their father's or mother's family name or a combination of the two. However, that has not always been the case in Denmark.