Genealogy Blog

A blog about genealogy in Denmark

by

Send me your Danish military levying brick walls and get a chance to have the problems solved free of charge in my 2018 advent calendar!


by

Seeing the original signature of my great-grandmother's brother reminded me of his cruel fate.


by

When looking for a Danish probate record, it is best to start by making a list of the available books for the relevant years.


by

Danish probate records sometimes contain information about the emigration of an ancestor or another relative.


by

King Frederik VII of Denmark started his reign as an absolute monarch, but less than one-and-a-half year later, on 5 June 1849, absolute monarchy was abolished when Frederik signed the Constitution of Denmark. The constitution granted the Danish people many rights; one of them was the freedom of religion, which had an impact on genealogical research in Denmark.


by

Danish soldiers, who took part in one or both Schleswig Wars of 1848-1850 and 1864 could apply for a commemorative medal. The applications have been indexed, so it is relatively easy to search for your Danish ancestors in these records. In this blog post I will teach you how to find your Danish war heroes.


by

Recipe collections can tell a lot about your ancestors. My great-grand aunt Else Marie Valborg Andersen Fisker (b. 1893 in Silkeborg, Denmark) left behind a notebook filled with recipes and one of them resembles my recipe for koldskål.


by

From 1683 until 1851, marriage in a church was the only legal method of getting married in Denmark. A marriage record from this period is therefore found in the church records, also called parish registers. Since 1851, civil marriage has been an option for Danes. For family researchers this means more sources to search. I was married in a church eight years ago today. I am celebrating my anniversary with this introduction to Danish marriage records from three centuries.


by

You can only find the address of the property or the correct map, with your ancestor's property if you know the name of the ejerlav (property area). In this post, I will demonstrate how to find the name of the ejerlav.


by

In the first part of this tutorial series, I explained how to find a lot on an old map and how to find today’s address of the place. The search was based on the cadastral identification number found in a 1916 census record. However, in many cases we know neither the cadastral id number nor today’s address of the lot. In this part of the tutorial, I will demonstrate how to find the cadastral id number, when it is not written in the census or any other identified record.