Genealogy Blog

A blog about genealogy in Denmark

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The county authorities were probate administrators for residents at self-owned farms in Denmark until about 1793, so you can find probate records for self-owners in the county collections.


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Record series with miscellaneous letters can be worth researching. Such a collection from Odense County Office holds correspondence about a soldier, who moved to another military levying district without reporting it to the military authorities.


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Odense County Office left a record series called county passports, certificates, letters of guarantee, public announcements and lists.


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Odense County Office has a collection containing original letters of apprenticeship.


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The Danish county offices had a wide variety of tasks and the collections from the county offices contain many record series of value to family researchers. In this year's Advent calendar, I will show examples of 25 records from a Danish county office.


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Since 1814 Danish parish registers have had preprinted headings. If you have the translation for the headings, you may be able to find your ancestor's record yourself. In this post I provide a translation of the headings in marriage records from Southern Denmark from the mid-1800s.


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In Denmark, elections used to be held by a raise of hands. Two record books from a municipality show whom each person voted for at a local election in 1841.


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Denmark played a significant role in the colonization of the Gold Coast and the West Indies. In this post I use Captain Rasmus Larsen as an example to show some of the records available from the colonies.


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Count Jens Christian Carl Krag-Juel-Vind-Frijs sent out a circular letter on 13 November 1834 demanding that all copyhold farms and houses under the manors Frijsenborg and Hagsholm were inspected once a year. Thereby the copyholders were regularly made aware of their obligation to maintain the buildings. The inspections were recorded and the records have been digitized. In this post I show an example of an inspection record.


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This post is a part of my posts for the Blogging from A to Z Challenge, which has now reached the letter X. In this post I give some examples from midwife records. Midwives had to keep records of all births they assisted from 1861 to 1976, but some midwives started keeping records before it was required. The records may not say much, but I think these details are fun to have.